Games for Impact in the Trump Era: What Do We have to Contribute?

2:00 – 5:00 | University of California, Irvine. Emerald Bay C | Wednesday, October 4, 2017
3 hours | 25 Participant Maximum
Cost: $75

Registration passes for half-day workshops are $75, but if you purchase two half-day workshops we are offering a special registration combo ticket for $100:

  • Gaming Pre-Conference Workshop Combo (Two Half-Day Workshops). Two half-day workshop combo for an immersive day of games, learning, and society. Morning (9:30 am – 12:30 pm): Designing Learning Games – an XCD Approach [Klopfer , Osterweil]. Afternoon (2 – 5 pm): Games for Impact in the Trump Era: What Do We Have to Contribute?

*Workshop has been cancelled.

Constance Steinkuehler | University of California, Irvine | Twitter:@constances
Kurt Squire | University of California, Irvine | Twitter :@ksquire

The recent electoral upset and subsequent cultural divide in the US has left scholars across all domains uneasy about the role of scholarly discourse in contemporary public discussion and unsure about their professional contribution to the rising social and political problems of our time: alternative facts and propaganda, satire instead of serious discourse, a politics of anger and resentment, the resurgence of racism and sexism, voter suppression, right wing media bias, and a reckless tweeting president. Are games and game culture part of the problem? part of the solution? Both? Or are they utterly irrelevant? What ought to be our most pressing agenda right now as we face the threat of constitution crisis, a cynical public, and an increasing divide between isolationists and globalists?

In this workshop, we explore the contributions games for impact could or should make to the pressing social and political issues of this new Trump era. Topics include both constructive and critical views, including but not limited to: information literacy beyond game forums, the perils of theorycrafting in the age of information echo chambers, games for civic participation, the perils of gamification of governance, games as a simulated surrogate for social activism, and the problem of transfer from virtual to political efficacy.

Short essays (500-1,500 words) will form the basis for our workshop. The DML workshop will focus on discussion and debate of the collection of essays and synthesis across the positions to enable a co-drafted manifesto for action. We welcome submissions from a variety of disciplinary approaches and learning organizations. Applicants to the workshop will submit short papers, and selected papers will be published in online proceedings for the workshop. Papers can include case studies, worked examples, and research papers. Participants will also be invited to submit a longer paper to be considered for a professional journal.

Workshop structure: lunch, firehose presentations, small group discussions, debate and synthesis. There will be a self-hosted happy hour that evening with other workshop participants at Hotel Irvine.

Download workshop flyer here.

Games for Impact in the Trump Era: What Do We have to Contribute?

Paper submissions should be publication-ready and follow these guidelines: 1) Microsoft Word document (.doc or .docx) converted into a PDF, 2) 1” margins on all sides, 3) Times New Roman or Arial font, 12 point size, APA (American Psychological Association) citation style. Applicants will be notified of acceptance September 2017. Should you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at dmlhub@hri.uci.edu. Thank you for applying!
  • Please add your name and institutional affiliation as you would like it to appear in the conference program.
  • Please list additional collaborators/organizers/authors in the space below. Include First and Last Name, Institutional Affiliation, Email, and Twitter handle.
  • Applicants to the workshop must submit short essays (500-1,500 words). Topics include both constructive and critical views, including but not limited to: information literacy beyond game forums, the perils of theorycrafting in the age of information echo chambers, games for civic participation, the perils of gamification of governance, games as a simulated surrogate for social activism, and the problem of transfer from virtual to political efficacy. Statements can take a variety of formats, such as descriptions of relevant research, description of problems of practice, case studies, calls to action, or stories from the front lines.
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    Accepted file types: pdf.
  • You don't have to register to apply, but if you are selected you and your team must purchase your own registration as well as fund/arrange travel to/from DML2017. Please note that the DML Pre-Conference Workshops are not included in the Main Conference registration fee.